A Journey into the Deep. On World Oceans Day

June 8, 2015 § Leave a comment

Today is World Oceans Day, a day to celebrate the “Blue Heart” of our Planet, which covers almost 71% of its surface, is the principal component of Earth’s hydrosphere, forms part of the carbon cycle, regulates climate and weather patterns, served as the impetus for the emergence of life 39 billion years ago, and continues to provide the life support system for all known species on Earth, supplying half of our oxygen. I have selected a stellar collection of ocean arts and designs, created by four multi-talented individuals and teams, to honor the occasion.

Underwater Photographs

Jim Kirklin
Oceanographer, software engineer, and nature photographer
2008-11-22 Monterey_0395-Edit

Purple Ring Top Snail (Calliostoma annulatum), Monterey Bay, California

With an advanced degree in geophysics and a career that has included time with Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute and work on research projects in 3 different oceans, as well as a number of years working with a startup developing a new class of autonomous vehicles used in the ocean, Kirklin has developed an intense interest in the ecology of the ocean and its varied marine life. He has also been photographing nature and wildlife most of his life and an avid SCUBA diver for the last 20 years. Sooner or later these three interests were bound to intersect in underwater photography, resulting in stunning images of ocean life in the waters off California, Florida, Carribean, Solomons, Micronesia and Galapagos Islands, etc.

A selection of these images can be seen in our Visual Arts gallery. Kirklin’s works give us a glimpse of the beautiful and mysterious life in the world’s oceans, only 5% of which has been explored. The ocean is the habitat of 230,000 known species, but over two million marine species are estimated to exist.

Kirklin’s underwater photography has won awards and been featured in shows on the Central Coast and Sonoma, California. « Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

The Devastating Stereotype of the Artless Scientist

February 25, 2015 § Leave a comment

Copyright StudioCanal and The Weinstein Company.

Copyright StudioCanal and The Weinstein Company.

Written by Dylan Nugent; posted on Medium on February 22nd, 2015

This article contains minor spoilers for the plots of The Imitation Game, The Theory of Everything, The Social Network, and A Beautiful Mind. Also containing these spoilers: history.

Tonight, two remarkably similar films compete to be crowned as the best film of 2014. Both The Imitation Game and The Theory of Everything cover a young, middle class, white, British, Cambridge-educated mathematician as they make groundbreaking claims and discoveries while trying to overcome an obstacle put in their path.

A few weeks ago Graham Moore, the Oscar-nominated (update: Oscar-winning, congratulations to Mr. Moore!) screenwriter for The Imitation Game, wrote a rather excellent article on Medium about the difficulty of portraying brilliant characters fairly. In his article, Mr. Moore talks about the historical importance of Alan Turing’s accomplishments and the stereotypical lense through which genius often gets portrayed. It surprised me when reading his article that until I reached the part about how he hadwritten the film in question, I actually assumed it was a criticism of the film’s treatment of Alan Turing. « Read the rest of this entry »

The Camera’s Cusp: Alfonso Cuarón Takes Filmmaking to a New Extreme With Gravity

January 22, 2014 § Leave a comment

By , originally published in the September 30, 2013 issue of New York Magazine.

Against a black screen, these words appear first.

“At 600 km above planet Earth, the temperature fluctuates between +258 and -148 degrees Fahrenheit. There is nothing to carry sound. No air pressure. No oxygen. Life in space is impossible.”

The screen disappears.

The planet—this planet, in three dimensions—appears.

Its arc engulfs you, outstretching in front, beside, and, somehow, below you. It is massive. Silently, majestically, cloud-covered and multicolored, it spins. There is the immediate sensation of everything—Earth, you—floating.

A spot appears along an orbital plane of the planet, off to the right, very far away, tiny, slowly moving closer. It is impossible to make out what it is. Telecommunication sparks: muffled, hollow, as if inside your ears, bits of a conversation between here and Houston. There are so many stars all around you. The planet continues spinning, the spot moves closer, drifting on its orbit until finally it arrives—the American space shuttle and a team of astronauts floating outside—and begins orbiting in the same space with you.

« Read the rest of this entry »

Where Am I?

You are currently browsing entries tagged with film at .