PULSE | Spring 2017: Science Imagery Oscars, Dementia & Arts, Design in Tech, Innovation Measurement, and the Disruption Myth

March 30, 2017 § Leave a comment

Introducing PULSE: Essinova’s quarterly highlight of insights, news and events at the creative edge across art, science, design, (purposeful) technology, leadership and innovation.

…Tis the Season for Science Imagery Oscars!

(And congratulations Greg and Brian!)

Spring is when both Wellcome and NSF/Popular Science unveil their awards for the best science images, videos and visualizations.

Wellcome Image Awards 2017

The Wellcome Image Awards are Wellcome’s most eye-catching celebration of science, medicine and life. Now in their 20th year, the Awards recognise the creators of informative, striking and technically excellent images that communicate significant aspects of healthcare and biomedical science.

This year’s Wellcome Image Awards were presented on 15 March 2017, celebrating the scientists, clinicians, photographers and artists who bring science to life through remarkable imaging.

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The Big Picture, I – The Fourth Industrial Revolution

April 4, 2016 § 3 Comments

The Fourth Industrial Revolution: what it means, how to respond

By Klaus Schwab, Founder and Executive Chairman, World Economic Forum, for Davos 2016

4th-industrial-rev
Excerpts:

“We stand on the brink of a technological revolution that will fundamentally alter the way we live, work, and relate to one another. In its scale, scope, and complexity, the transformation will be unlike anything humankind has experienced before. … « Read the rest of this entry »

First Quarter in Review: The Big Picture, Ahead and Around

April 4, 2016 § 4 Comments

fourth-industrial-revolution-robot

Unlike most of my posts, this issue (or this series, in multiple issues) does not feature specific artworks (which, by the way, many of you have told me to be beautiful–thank you!). Instead, I will share with you news, events and readings I came across in the first quarter of 2016, which collectively form a “big picture” context, helping to demonstrate that Essinova’s exploration into the arts is not just about beauty, although that itself is a worthy cause.

Top 10 skills 2020It is a big picture of the next industrial revolution and the future that mankind is entering, in which art and culture will be of fundamental importance not only to the human race as a whole but also to private industry. Philosophically speaking, art (with feelings) might become one of our last bastions of human privilege as machines can replace us in pretty much everything else. On a more practical level, culture and humanities, alongside science and technology, will become part of the very fabric of tomorrow’s businesses, rather than an afterthought marketing flair. This is necessitated by the new demands of solution design, consumer experience and talent development. « Read the rest of this entry »

Haute Couture et Nature Sublime. Magnified and Magnifique.

August 18, 2015 § Leave a comment

August is for vacation.

Also for photography!

As I gather my gear for some amateur photo action on my upcoming holiday in the Caribbean, I would like to leave you, in this month’s newsletter, with three amazing bodies of photography works I recently came across, from three ingenious photographers around the world:


Fashion and Nature

Valentino pre-fall 2015 | "Pillars of Creation" through the eyes of Hubble telescope (photo by NASA)

Valentino pre-fall 2015 | “Pillars of Creation” through the eyes of Hubble telescope (photo by NASA).  Pairing by Liliya Hudyakova.

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Anatomy Inside Rodin’s Hands

August 6, 2014 § 1 Comment

As impressive as the Rodin collection at Stanford University’s Cantor Art Center – one of the largest in the world, with 200 works in all – most of them are not one and only edition of the artist’s masterpieces.  As part of his bequest, Auguste Rodin authorized the Nation of France to continue to cast his works poshumously, either from his original plaster molds or from molds newly taken from his plasters.  Up to twelve examples of each size can be cast of each of Rodin’s works.

However, a recent exhibition at the museum (on view April 9 – August 3), inspired by the great artist’s sculptures of human hands,  was truly one of its kind.

A multidisciplinary collaboration between the Cantor Art Center and Dr. James Chang, a hand reconstruction surgeon at Stanford’s School of Medicine, supported by the School’s Division of Clinical Anatomy and the Lane Medical Library, “Inside Rodin’s Hands: Art, Technology, and Surgery” looked at the artist’s powerful depictions of hands with an anatomical eye, aided by cutting-edge technologies such as 3D imaging and augmented reality.    Take for example Left Hand of Eustache de Saint-Pierre.  The images and video clip here illustrate the three-dimension, anatomical view for visitors to see “beneath the skin”, with imaginary bones, nerves and blood vessels:

Photo of Rodin's sculpture "Left hand of Eustache de Saint-Pierre" during the scanning process. Photo by Matthew Hasel, Production Manager, Division of Clinical Anatomy, Stanford School of Medicine. Art caption: Auguste Rodin (France, 1840–1917), “Left Hand of Eustache de Saint-Pierre,” c. 1886. Bronze. Cantor Arts Center collection, Gift of the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation, 1998.359.

“Left hand of Eustache de Saint-Pierre” during the scanning process. Photo by Matthew Hasel, Production Manager, Division of Clinical Anatomy, Stanford School of Medicine. Art caption: Auguste Rodin (France, 1840–1917), “Left Hand of Eustache de Saint-Pierre,” c. 1886. Bronze. Cantor Arts Center collection, Gift of the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation, 1998.359.

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